Welcome to Veterinary Medicine Electronic Library

Your Destination for Most Unique Veterinary Resources

  •  » If You're Vet Student & Searching For Educational Stuff
  •  » You're Researcher Looking For Articles & Journals
  •  » You're a Veterinarian & You Want to Improve Your Skills
  •  » You're a Pet Owner Looking For a Guide

...then you have come to the right place!

we will try to help you with your needs.

YES! I want to register an account for free right now!

N.B.: Our Services are Free of Charge, because; Knowledge must be free

NOTICE Notice: This is an old thread. The last post was 1815 days ago. If your post is not directly related to this discussion please consider making a new thread.
Results 1 to 1 of 1

Thread: Stone Disease in Animals

  1. #1
    Dr VetTox's Avatar
    Moderator Of Veterinary Journals

    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Total Posts
    Rep Power
    Total thanks received
    Thanks for this post
    Pre-Veterinary I'm from Egypt

    Default Stone Disease in Animals

    Book Title: Urinary Tract Stone Disease
    Chapter Title: Stone Disease in Animals
    Authors: Doreen M. Houston, Andrew Moore, Denise A. Elliott and Vincent C. Biourge
    Copyright: 2001

    Uroliths have been reported in most animals, but their pathophysiology and management have been studied most in dogs and cats. In both species, urinary stones are responsible for 15–20% of cases of lower urinary tract disease. Despite common belief, stones are more frequent in dogs – especially small dogs – than in cats. Upper urinary tract stones are less common in dogs and cats than in humans. Dietary management has been definitively shown to modulate the occurrence of struvite and purine stones in both dogs and cats. The pathophysiology of calcium oxalate stones is likely to be multifactorial, and the exact roles of diet and urinary pH remain to be investigated. Pending this work, promotion of diuresis and urine dilution by feeding a moist and/or higher sodium diet could be beneficial in both dogs and cats. Prevalence of other stone types is very low in both dogs and cats and their treatment is a combination of surgical, dietary, and medical management.

    Last edited by Dr VetTox; 15th November 2011 at 03:12 PM.
    We are HerE To HelP Others!!
    In Hidden Content Hidden Content A Very SmalL WorlD !!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Similar Threads

  1. [Surgery] Animal Bladder Stone Surgery
    By balsam shalaan in forum Veterinary Videos
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 22nd June 2013, 12:02 AM
  2. Disease in Wild Animals: Investigation and Management
    By Saraajka in forum Wild Animals eBooks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29th August 2012, 06:27 PM
  3. [ Hot Chapter ] Viral skin disease in animals
    By New Vet in forum Hot Chapters
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 22nd January 2012, 01:48 AM
  4. Beasts of the Earth: Animals, Humans and Disease
    By iucifjr in forum Animal Products Safety and Hygiene
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 8th August 2009, 04:28 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts

About VET E-Lib

    Your Destination for Most Unique Veterinary Resources. If You're Vet Student & Searching For Educational Stuff, if you're Researcher Looking For Articles & Journals, if you're a Veterinarian & You Want to Improve Your Skills, if you're a Pet Owner Looking For a Guide, then you have come to the right place! and we will try to help you with your needs.

Quick Links

Follow us on

Facebook youtube Twitter RSS Feed Email Us