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Thread: Articles on horses

  1. #1
    Mirmur's Avatar
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    Default Articles on horses

    Hi guys!

    I do a lot of bibliographical research on horses, especially on acute inflammation and emergency for my PhD, so I have access to good articles through my Uni. I was thinking of posting interesting stuff on this all horse thread. I will try to do this as often as possible, whenever I find something interesting, so make sure to check regularly for new posts.

    So guys...enjoy

    Effects of α2-adrenergic drugs on small intestinal motility in the horse: An in vitro study
    The Veterinary Journal, In Press, Corrected Proof, Available online 22 January 2010
    Chiara Zullian, Alessandro Menozzi, Cristina Pozzoli, Enzo Poli, Simone Bertini

    Abstract

    The effects of selective α2-agonists (xylazine, detomidine and medetomidine) and antagonists (yohimbine and atipamezole) on in vitro small intestine motility in the horse were evaluated. Samples of equine jejunum were placed in isolated organ baths and drug-induced modifications of motility were measured by means of an isotonic transducer. All tested α2-agonists dose-dependently reduced both spontaneous and electrically-evoked phasic contractions. Conversely, α2-antagonists were ineffective when tested alone, and showed a heterogeneous and dose-independent ability to inhibit agonist activity. In particular, the antagonism exerted by higher concentrations of both yohimbine and atipamezole against α2-agonists was weaker than when lower concentrations were used. The data are indicative of the presence of both pre- and post-synaptic α2-adrenoceptors with inhibitory activity on equine jejunum motility, and support a possible therapeutic utility of these drugs in horse intestinal disorders associated with hypermotility.

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    In my opinion, a horse is the animal to have. Eleven-hundred pounds of raw muscle, power, grace, and sweat between your legs - it's something you just can't get from a pet hamster.
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    The Pain State Arising From the Laminitic Horse: Insights Into Future Analgesic Therapies
    Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, Volume 30, Issue 2, February 2010, Pages 79-82
    Tony L. Yaksh

    No abstract is available for this article.
    Article Outline

    Laminitic Hoof and Pain Hoof Innervation Mechanisms of Pain in Laminitis Inflammation Nerve Injury Future Targets for Laminitic Pain Therapy Targeting Peripheral Transduction Endothelin Tumor Necrosis Factor Sodium Channels Targeting Central Facilitation Primary Afferent TRPV1 Receptor Neurokinin 1 Receptor Toxins Future Research Direction SummaryReferencesENJOY!
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    In my opinion, a horse is the animal to have. Eleven-hundred pounds of raw muscle, power, grace, and sweat between your legs - it's something you just can't get from a pet hamster.
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  3. #3
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    Smile Venous blood lactate evaluation in equine neonatal intensive care

    Theriogenology
    Volume 73, Issue 3, February 2010, Pages 343-357


    Venous blood lactate evaluation in equine neonatal intensive care



    C. Castagnetti, A. Pirrone, J. Mariella and G. Mari






    Abstract

    The use of blood lactate concentration as an indicator of prognosis and disease severity has become a common practice in equine medicine, especially with the validation of handheld analyzers. However, few authors described lactate concentration in critically ill foals, and there are no published studies about the use of handheld analyzers in neonatal foals. In this study, for the first time in the equine neonate, we validated the Lactate Scout analyzer, both in healthy and in critically ill foals. The study also describes the normal range for blood lactate in 26 healthy neonatal foals during the first 72 h of life. Moreover, the utility of venous lactate measurement in 88 critically ill foals was determined, describing lactate values in the most common neonatal pathologies, evaluating serial blood lactate measurements, and investigating its prognostic value. The comparison with the enzymatic-colorimetric reference method showed that the Lactate Scout analyzer is reliable. The mean difference (bias 2SD) between the two methods was close to zero for all comparisons, and the SD of difference was 0.76 with a 95% confidence interval from −1.58 to 1.40 mmol/L. In healthy foals, blood lactate concentrations at birth and at 12 h of life were statistically higher (P < 0.01) than lactate concentrations measured at subsequent times. In critically ill foals, the highest lactate concentration at admission was found in hemorrhagic shock, septic shock, and complicated perinatal asphyxia syndrome (PAS). Our results showed that hyperlactatemia, although it does not provide diagnostic information, indicates the severity of illness and the need for an early and aggressive intervention. This could be very useful both during hospitalization and in the field to support veterinarians in making a decision about referral. Furthermore lactatemia proved to be a reliable prognostic parameter: In nonsurviving foals, hyperlactatemia persisted during the entire hospitalization, whereas in survivors there were no significant differences after 24 h from admission. Because prognostic parameters have certain limitations, hyperlactatemia should not be used alone to decide whether to discontinue treatments in critically ill foals. A careful and complete clinical examination is always essential.



    Keywords: Critically ill; Foal; Lactate; Lactate Scout


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    ENJOY!
    Last edited by Mirmur; 18th March 2010 at 10:00 AM. Reason: forgot to post title
    In my opinion, a horse is the animal to have. Eleven-hundred pounds of raw muscle, power, grace, and sweat between your legs - it's something you just can't get from a pet hamster.
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    Default Laminitis 2010

    Hi guys! Some new stuff on laminitis!
    first something on patophysiology

    Overview of What We Know About the Pathophysiology of Laminitis
    Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, Volume 30, Issue 2, February 2010, Pages 83-86
    Susan C. Eades
    Inflammation Evidence of Cellular Infiltration Enzymatic Dysregulation Other Inflammatory Mediators Oxidants Metabolic Syndrome Alteration of Endothelial and Venous FunctionReferences
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    ...and some on a brand new treatment!

    Deep Digital Flexor Tenotomy as a Treatment for Horses With Chronic Laminitis
    Journal of Equine Veterinary Science, Volume 30, Issue 2, February 2010, Page 111
    C.F. Mitchell, R.E. Beadle
    Article Outline

    Take Home Message Introduction Materials and Methods Results Discussion/Conclusion/Clinical Relevance
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    ENJOY!
    In my opinion, a horse is the animal to have. Eleven-hundred pounds of raw muscle, power, grace, and sweat between your legs - it's something you just can't get from a pet hamster.
    If you liked something, don't forget to say thanks!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. #5
    Mirmur's Avatar
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    Evaluation of a protocol for fast localised abdominal sonography of horses (FLASH) admitted for colic
    The Veterinary Journal, In Press, Corrected Proof,
    March 2010
    Valeria Busoni, Virginie De Busscher, Diego Lopez, Denis Verwilghen, Dominique Cassart

    Abstract

    The aim of this prospective study was to establish a protocol for fast localised abdominal sonography of horses (FLASH) admitted for colic. The FLASH protocol was then presented to clinicians without extensive ultrasound (US) experience to determine whether they could learn to use it in less than 15 min. The clinical subjects comprised 36 horses that had been referred for colic over a 2 month period. Each horse was examined at admission and FLASH findings at seven topographical locations were compared to serial clinical examinations, surgical and non-surgical outcomes, or with post-mortem reports.FLASH was able to show free abdominal fluid and abnormal intestinal loops, with a mean time of 10.7 min required to complete the protocol. The positive and negative predictive values of requirement for surgery of dilated turgid small intestinal loops using FLASH were 88.89% and 81.48%, respectively. The results suggested that FLASH is a technique that can be used in an emergencysetting by veterinarians without extensive US experience to detect major intra-abdominal abnormalities in horses with colic.



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    ENJOY!!!
    In my opinion, a horse is the animal to have. Eleven-hundred pounds of raw muscle, power, grace, and sweat between your legs - it's something you just can't get from a pet hamster.
    If you liked something, don't forget to say thanks!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

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