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Selected Background Findings and Interpretation of Common Lesions in the Female Reproducti

pathvet

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Selected Background Findings and Interpretation of Common Lesions in the Female Reproductive System in Macaques
by J. MARK CLINE, CHARLES E. WOOD, JUSTIN D. VIDAL, ROSS P. TARARA, EBERHARD BUSE, GERHARD F. WEINBAUER, EVELINE P. C. T. DE RIJK, AND ERIC VAN ESCH
Toxicologic Pathology, 2008, 36: 142S-163S
Abstract:
The authors describe a selection of normal findings and common naturally occurring lesions in the reproductive system of female macaques,
including changes in the ovaries, uterus, cervix, vagina, and mammary glands. Normal features of immature ovaries, uteri, and mammary glands are
described. Common non-neoplastic lesions in the ovaries include cortical mineralization, polyovular follicles, cysts, ovarian surface epithelial hyperplasia,
and ectopic ovarian tissue. Ovarian neoplasms include granulosa cell tumors, teratomas, and ovarian surface epithelial tumors. Common nonneoplastic
uterine findings include loss of features of normal cyclicity, abnormal bleeding, adenomyosis, endometriosis, epithelial plaques, and
pregnancy-associated vascular remodeling. Hyperplastic and neoplastic lesions of the uterus include endometrial polyps, leiomyomas, and rarely
endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial adenocarcinoma. Vaginitis is common. Cervical lesions include endocervical squamous metaplasia, polyps,
and papillomavirus-associated lesions. Lesions in the mammary gland are most often proliferative and range from ductal hyperplasia to invasive carcinoma.
Challenges to interpretation include the normal or pathologic absence of menstrual cyclicity and the potential misinterpretation of sporadic
lesions, such as epithelial plaques or papillomavirus-associated lesions. Interpretation of normal and pathologic findings is best accomplished with
knowledge of the life stage, reproductive history, and hormonal status of the animal.
 
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